Lexicon

Welcome to AHRMM's healthcare supply chain Lexicon. This database contains terms used throughout the healthcare supply chain field. Simply click on the link to access the entire definition.

AHRMM thanks Kate Vitasek and Supply Chain Visions for their contribution of certain terms to the Lexicon. Terms supplied by Supply Chain Visions are used with permission. Supply Chain Vision’s Glossary of Supply Chain Management Terms appears on the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals website. AHRMM also acknowledges Michael B. Neely with Perimeter Solutions Group for his role in developing healthcare-specific terms.

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Source:
= definition provided by CSCMP
= definition provided by AHRMM
  • 3PL

    See Third Party Logistics
  • 4PL

    See Forth Party Logistics
  • 5 Whys

    The five whys is a question asking method which is used to explore the cause/effect relationships underlying a particular problem or process. When an answer is given to a question continue by asking why the answer is appropriate. This allows for a drill down to determine a root cause of a defect or problem, or rationale for the process.
  • 5-Point Annual Average

    Method frequently used in PMG studies to establish a representative average for a one year period.
  • 5-S Program

    A program for organizing work areas. Sometimes referred to as elements, each of the five components of the program begins with the letter "S." They include sort, systemize, shine or sweep, standardize, and sustain. In the UK, the concept is converted to the 5-C program comprising five comparable components: clear out, configure, clean and check, conformity, and custom and practice. The 5-S program is frequently combined with precepts of the Lean Manufacturing Initiative. Even when used separately, however, the 5-S (or 5-C) program is said to yield excellent results. Implementation of the program involves introducing each of the five elements in order, which reportedly generates multiple benefits, including product diversification, higher quality, lower costs, reliable deliveries, improved safety, and higher availability rate.
  • 6-S

    An expanded definition of 5-S which includes safety
  • 7 Wastes

    One of the basic concepts of Lean management, the seven 'deadly wastes' are best remembered by the acronym TIM WOOD: