Lexicon

Welcome to AHRMM's healthcare supply chain Lexicon. This database contains terms used throughout the healthcare supply chain field. Simply click on the link to access the entire definition.

AHRMM thanks Kate Vitasek and Supply Chain Visions for their contribution of certain terms to the Lexicon. Terms supplied by Supply Chain Visions are used with permission. Supply Chain Vision’s Glossary of Supply Chain Management Terms appears on the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals website. AHRMM also acknowledges Michael B. Neely with Perimeter Solutions Group for his role in developing healthcare-specific terms.

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  • RAC

    The Recovery Audit Contractor (RAC) program was created through the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003[1] to identify and recover improper Medicare payments paid to healthcare providers under Fee-For-Service Medicare plans.[2] The United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is required by law to make the program permanent for all states by January 1, 2010.
  • Rack

    A storage device for handling material in pallets. A rack usually provides storage for pallets arranged in vertical sections with one or more pallets to a tier. Some racks accommodate more than one-pallet-deep storage. Some racks are static, meaning that the rack contents remain in a fixed position until physically moved. Some racks are designed with a sloped shelf to allow products to "flow" down as product in the front is removed. Replenishment of product on a flow rack may be from the rear, or the front in a "push back" manner.
  • Rack

    A piece of equipment which is used to store materials off of the floor. Racks will typically have shelves, but may be designed to hold materials vertically such as lengths of pipe of metal bar stock.
  • Racking

    The act of placing materials onto a rack. May also refer to hardware which is used to build racks.
  • Radio Frequency (RF or RFID)

    A form of wireless communications that lets users relay information via electromagnetic energy waves from a terminal to a base station, which is linked in turn to a host computer. The terminals can be place at a fixed station, mounted on a wall or be a portable device. The base station contains a transmitter and receiver for communication with the terminals. RF systems use either narrowband or spread-spectrum transmissions. A radio-frequency system can relay data instantly, thus updating inventory records in so-called "real time" and for managing movement of equipment within the hospital.
  • Radio Frequency (RF)

    A form of wireless communications that lets users relay information via electromagnetic energy waves from a terminal to a base station, which is linked in turn to a host computer. The terminals can be place at a fixed station, mounted on a forklift truck, or carried in the worker's hand. The base station contains a transmitter and receiver for communication with the terminals. RF systems use either narrow-band or spread-spectrum transmissions. Narrow-band data transmissions move along a single limited radio frequency, while spread-spectrum transmissions move across several different frequencies. When combined with a bar-code system for identifying inventory items, a radio-frequency system can relay data instantly, thus updating inventory records in so-called "real time."
  • Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)

    The use of radio frequency technology including RFID tags and tag readers to identify objects. Objects may include virtually anything physical, such as equipment, pallets of stock, or even individual units of product. RFID tags can be active or passive. Active tags contain a power source and emit a signal constantly. Passive tags receive power from the radio waves sent by the scanner / reader. The inherent advantages of RFID over bar code technology are: 1) the ability to be read over longer distances, 2) the elimination of requirement for "line of sight" reads, 3) added capacity to contain information, and 4) RFID tag data can be updated / changed.